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Was Y2K a Waste?

Planning for a possible crisis caused us to take inventory of our resources and supplies, and make a plan for our needs to be met if we were suddenly not able to access our normal suppliers.  We had already changed our lifestyle greatly soon after we married and had our first miscarriage.  Our diet is now geared to build up our bodies and maximize our productivity for God’s glory.  To us it is a matter of wise stewardship. 

Most of our diet consists of natural whole foods that are not processed.  One great advantage in this is that unprocessed foods are not as expensive as most foods purchased in the grocery store.  In 1999 Silver Oak was teaching school, an occupation not known for high income, so we had to be extremely frugal in our planning.  Our oldest child was four, and our only child at the time, so storing up basic food staples was not nearly as large a project as it now is with eight hungry mouths. 

Among other things, we stored wheat berries, brown rice, and pinto beans in five-gallon buckets with sealed lids.  A few years after Y2K we were still eating some of the supplies we had stored up, and they were such a blessing during some financial difficulties we faced.  Since that time we have made storing such supplies a way of life, and have learned some tricks, such as freezing grains for several days before storing in airtight containers to kill any larvae that may have come along in our bulk order.  Placing dried bay leaves just inside the lids also deters bugs.

What about the “wasted” money we used to purchase a generator, propane camp stove, and other items?  Tomorrow I’ll tell you about the tropical storm that left out our power for several days.

Was Y2K a Waste?

Was Y2K a Waste?

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